THE RUSSIAN IMPOSTOR: OR, THE HISTORY OF MUSKOVIE, Under The Usurpation of Boris and the Imposture of Demetrius, Late Emperors of Muskovy. Sir Roger MANLEY.

THE RUSSIAN IMPOSTOR: OR, THE HISTORY OF MUSKOVIE, Under The Usurpation of Boris and the Imposture of Demetrius, Late Emperors of Muskovy

London: by J[ames]. C[otrell]. for Thomas Basset, 1674. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (4-1/4" x 6-3/4") bound in 3/4 brown morocco leather and brown boards with a gilt-stamped spine; [1], 250 pages. Engraving on verso of title page; lacking the 12-page preface. Wing M75. An appendix was included in the Second Edition published in 1677 though retaining the 1674 date on the title page. The online ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA gives the background on Manley's subject matter: "False Dmitry, also called Pseudo-demetrius, Russian Lzhedmitry, or Dmitry Samozvanets, any of three different pretenders to the Muscovite throne who, during the Time of Troubles (1598-1613), claimed to be Dmitry Ivanovich, the son of Tsar Ivan IV the Terrible (reigned 1533-1584) who had died mysteriously in 1591 while still a child." Leo Loewenson in THE SLAVONIC AND EAST EUROPEAN REVIEW states, "THE RUSSIAN IMPOSTOR is of course not a primary historical source in the sense in which such a classification is applicable to reports by foreign travellers. It is obviously a secondary work, i.e. the result of research. Not even the geographical description of Russia, with which the historical narrative is introduced, contains the slightest reason to assume that Manley had ever visited the country. Moreover apart from inconclusive remarks like that about the uncertainty still prevailing in Russia with regard to the identity of the Impostor there is also nothing to suggest that any information was derived from hearsay, But the lack of any value as a primary source does not deprive the work of great historiographical interest The fact that it is wholly based on research gives it a claim to being one of the earliest learned histories of Russia written in this country" (Vol. 31, No. 76 Dec., 1952; page 239). Title page darkened with some wear at the edges, rest of text just a tad darkened; preface lacking. Light rubbing to spine tips but binding Near Fine. Overall Very Good and uncommon. Item #019171

Price: $1,000.00

See all items in 17th Century
See all items by